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The Zonka Feedback Blog

Feedback Management, Feedback Trends, Feedback Technology, Data & Analysis, amazing Survey Tips & New Features at Zonka

How, When and Where to Collect Net Promoter Score Surveys

How, When and Where to Collect Net Promoter Score Surveys

Net Promoter Score Survey usually referred as NPS survey is a quick and easy survey, which usually takes taking 15-20 seconds to fill. It very effective compared to surveys that require 15-20 minutes of time. In addition to the ultimate question, adding a follow-up question about the reason for the score makes it even more powerful. It gives a clear direction to the follow-up actions to be taken. The Net Promoter Score Survey is very dynamic and any organization that is willing to implement the NPS survey has the opportunity to perform the survey process in one of two ways: Transactional and Relationship. Which approach/type of survey would be best for your organization will depend upon certain things like your organization type, the number of customers and your customer lifecycle etc. For making your choice of NPS survey type easy, we have elaborated both the approaches below - Types of Net Promoter Score Survey There are 2 broad categorizations under which NPS surveys are divided. 1. Relationship NPS Survey Relationship surveys attempt to investigate a customer’s loyalty towards a company/brand. These surveys focus on extracting the overall satisfaction of the customers with the company. They occur at regular intervals (monthly, quarterly, half-yearly).  The company's which are just beginning with using the NPS system, they should start with Relationship style of surveying. Send out your NPS surveys in stages initially and then keep a tab on touch points that are majorly affecting it. Transactional surveys should then focus on those touchpoints that relationship surveys indicate as the most important…read more

Challenges in Delivering a Great Customer Experience

How much do you know about your customers? Knowing personal tastes, preferences, income bracket and birthdays of your customers forms just the beginning of understanding customer needs. Often, the challenge is to study the data properly to understand what is effective and what does not make any sense. While the right data helps, it also boils down to how you collect the data. Formulating an effective customer feedback management system isn't an easy job. It requires in-depth understanding of what your customers are looking for and what you can do to meet their expectations. With increasing competition across all the major domains, it is essential that you deliver a great customer experience to have a profitable run on the market. Despite having everything right, you might be experiencing difficulty in meeting the expectations of your customers. By finding out the issues and then resolving them, you'd not only win over the confidence of your existing customers but also get new ones, thanks to word of mouth. Here is a list of some of the major challenges businesses face that hinders customer experience. Delivering consistent customer experience across multiple channels: Customers no longer evaluate your services based on individual touch-points. Instead, they look at the service, on the whole, as a single entity. Regardless of whether you're interacting with the customer in the store, via email or through a phone call, they should receive a consistently good experience. Systemizing the ‘customer feedback process’: Customer feedback is an essential component of any business that can help you…read more
Customer Service – The New Differentiator

Customer Service – The New Differentiator

The creation of a new business in any industry is followed by closely analyzing what the competitors are doing and then doing it better – typically by cost-cutting, or building superior products. This is what has now come to be known as the “Red Ocean Strategy”. Market share can be captured only at the expense of another business, as the size of the industry is limited and known. As the industry matures however, businesses need to move beyond traditional competition strategies, because the industry becomes far too crowded to sustain existing competition. Once existing growth opportunities have been exhausted, new ones must be created by exploring “blue oceans”, or hitherto unknown market spaces. A “Blue Ocean Strategy” involves shifting the focus from competitors to customers. It entails unlocking value by expanding the current boundaries of the industry, achieved through innovation of product (or service) offerings. The strategy inherently assumes that industry size and scope is not known and value can actually be created, rather than simply be distributed as in a “Red Ocean”. This essentially renders the competition irrelevant with respect to capturing the market. A classic example from the restaurant industry would be that of Starbucks. For too long successful restaurants were synonymous with low prices and a wide variety of menu items. But this particular company started on the idea of providing the best possible experience to customers, even if this meant charging a premium above the market prices. The brand Starbucks is a promise of exceptional service and experience to the customers.…read more
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