×
Request a Demo

Request a Demo

Look No Further. Get Started Today

 
 

Verification

The Zonka Feedback Blog

Feedback Management, Feedback Trends, Feedback Technology, Data & Analysis, amazing Survey Tips & New Features at Zonka

101 Customer Service Statistics To Lay Your CX Strategy On

101 Customer Service Statistics To Lay Your CX Strategy On

“Your brand is what other people say about you when you're not in the room.” – Jeff Bezos, Amazon. This quote brilliantly explains the exact sentiments that a customer holds for a brand. To make sure that your customers are always gaga over you and your service when you are not even offering them a discount, we give you these 101 statistics that we have assembled. You can undoubtedly form a Business CX strategy while keeping these in mind for creating better and delightful experiences for your customers. Customer Experience Statistics 50% of customer experience natural occurring churn every 5 years. Only 1 out of 26 unhappy customers complain. The rest churn. A lesson here is that companies should not view absence of feedback as a sign of satisfaction. The true enemy is indifference. 91% of unhappy customers who are non-complainers simply leave. It is 6-7X more expensive for companies to attract new customers than to keep existing customers. 65% of companies are able to successfully upsell or cross-sell to existing customers. Only 12% of companies are able to successfully upsell or cross-sell to new customers. 75% of brands do not know what engagement means - but are measuring “it” 90% of consumers said they have had poor experiences seeking customer support on mobile. 89% of marketing leaders expect to compete primarily on the basis of customer experience by 2016, as compared with 36% four years ago. By 2016, mobile search will generate 27.8 billion more queries than desktop search. By 2020, the customer will…read more
Customer Service – The New Differentiator

Customer Service – The New Differentiator

The creation of a new business in any industry is followed by closely analyzing what the competitors are doing and then doing it better – typically by cost-cutting, or building superior products. This is what has now come to be known as the “Red Ocean Strategy”. Market share can be captured only at the expense of another business, as the size of the industry is limited and known. As the industry matures however, businesses need to move beyond traditional competition strategies, because the industry becomes far too crowded to sustain existing competition. Once existing growth opportunities have been exhausted, new ones must be created by exploring “blue oceans”, or hitherto unknown market spaces. A “Blue Ocean Strategy” involves shifting the focus from competitors to customers. It entails unlocking value by expanding the current boundaries of the industry, achieved through innovation of product (or service) offerings. The strategy inherently assumes that industry size and scope is not known and value can actually be created, rather than simply be distributed as in a “Red Ocean”. This essentially renders the competition irrelevant with respect to capturing the market. A classic example from the restaurant industry would be that of Starbucks. For too long successful restaurants were synonymous with low prices and a wide variety of menu items. But this particular company started on the idea of providing the best possible experience to customers, even if this meant charging a premium above the market prices. The brand Starbucks is a promise of exceptional service and experience to the customers.…read more
add-icon